About your Search

20121204
20121204
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
in self defense. >>> republicans took the bait. they delivered a counter proposal to president obama's plan to avert the fiscal cliff. guess what, the white house rejected it, calling the gop proposal unbalanced and not serious. translation? no tax hikes on the wealthy so democrats said forget about it. we thought you should take a look. it totals $2.2 trillion in deficit reduction over ten years. the part that stood out to us was $600 billion in proposed savings in medicare reforms. how? in part by raising the age of eligibility to 65 to maybe 67. turning down the gop proposal, dan pfieffer said, quote, it provides no details on which deductions they would eliminate, which loopholes they will close or which medicare savings they would achieve." let's head now to the white house and dan lothian. the white house will not offer a counter proposal, right? what's going on here? >> reporter: well, you know, i think the white house is digging in. the president said early on in this process that he would only sit down and really move forward, negotiate on this in any meaningful way if the t
to make a deal can't make a deal. yesterday, republicans proposed steep spending cuts but gave no ground on president obama's call to raise taxes on the wealthiest americans. here's what the president told bloomberg's white house correspondent about that. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. you know he talks, for example, about $800 billion worth of revenue but was he says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the platte it doesn't work. when i've said is, i am prepared to work with the speaker and democrats and republicans to go after excessive health care costs in our federal health care system, we're going to have to strengthen those systems and i think we can do that without hurting seniors, without hurting beneficiaries. i think that, you know, there's probably more cuts that we can squeeze out, though we've made over a trillion worth of spending cuts. >> you'll remember only a week ago the democrats proposed their solution to this and it was rejected by the republicans. the president is reiterating that taxes have to go up
increase on the rich but also will blame the republicans if we go over the fiscal cliff, and this gives, frankly, this gives the white house and this gives the obama administration much more bargaining leverage. >> well, the former treasury secretary has one thing to say but many other voices are a virtual kcacophony where wolf blitzer has to sit every day. >> in the short term the president has more leverage right now because if they do nothing, let's say they avoid any legislation between now and the end of the year, starting january 1st we go over that so-called fiscal cliff, tax rates go up not just for the rich but for the middle class, for everyone, all those cuts in domestic spending and naths security spending, they go into effect. people aren't going to be happy about that, and the president will be able to say, look, i begged them, i repeatedly said 98% of the american public, they wouldn't get a tax increase if we just took them out of the equation, let's pass legislation extending the bush tax cuts for everyone earning under $250,000 a year. they didn't do it. so, you know,
christmas. worry about next year if this strike goes on. as i told you yesterday, the republican counterproposal for heading off the fiscal cliff was a nonstarter. president obama made clear today that it will not be possible to get a deal to avert the fiscal cliff without raising taxes on the wealthy. the gop's plan did promise $2.2 trillion in deficit savings over the next decade. that's about half of what the president promises in his plan. but the gop plan does it without any tax hikes on the rich. and that is not going to fly with democrats. republicans for their part are unhappy that the president's proposal calls for $200 billion more in stimulus spending over the next year. here is how that breaks down. $95 billion to extend the payroll tax cut for one year, $30 billion to extend jobless benefit for one year, $50 billion to spend on roads and bridges and another $25 billion on short-term stuff like a temporary tax deduction for small businesses. the argument in favor of the president's plan is this could help people still hurting from years of economic trouble, but you kn
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)